Identity Theft

Sorry, Apple People, You’re Just Not That Popular

I know, you think I’m less than smart, but let me assure you, I have some idea what I’m talking about. I began as a wildly satisfied Apple ][+ user many decades ago. While others bought “inferior” computers that hit the market, from PET, Commodore, Atari and TRS-80…well, Atari was the bomb for gaming….I was forging ahead. I moved to the Mac line with a 512K, then an SE, a Mac II, then a IIcx. I learned how to make a computer work for humans because of Apple.

However, here’s the reality. Macs aren’t that popular. I support this by playing into the meme that Macs don’t get viruses, ergo, they are superior platforms. Nope, you have that wrong, but there is the genius of not only Apple, but the evangelized Apple faithful that have somehow missed the point of their lack of bad programmings disrupting their lives at the worst moment, as PC users have come to know and still not love.

Here’s the truth staring you in the face, Apple fanatics: You’re not popular with the people who create viruses, and therefore, you don’t get them. It’s not that your computer is in this uber operating system world, impenetrable by mere mortals out to steal credit card and bank account numbers. I know, in just about every single movie where the earth is saved from alines of environmental disaster, Apples are prominently displayed and used in the crucial scenes. I also know some of you believe that to be the real case.

What’s really up is this: The MacOS is built on top of UNIX, which is very secure, but the face that, depending on the link, the Apple market is about 10-12% and therefore, the effort to infect them is not worth the ROI, on one analysis point. Take the next step: How many Macs are used to manage and handle credit card databases, and large customer files? Pretty much none. Besides taking quite a bit of effort to learn the system inside and out, even if they could find ways in through security flaws, they would most likely find intellectual property, but not something they could make money on, like entire user profiles of banking/financial services, a key set of data for identity theft.

Consider, from a business owner’s view point: If you could set up to serve 87-90% of the market for the same effort to serve 10-13%, with the return per customer the same, which direction would you head? There will be a minnow out there (thank you, Scott Weber!) who gets this answer wrong and insists loudly they are correct, but you all know the right answer to remain viable in the market. That’s why you’re also not infected. Far more ROI in spending your energy developing and working the PC market and the associated Windows based server farms. Not to mention, Apple made a run at the server world and built a very cool piece of technology, but like Beta tape, the public went for the lesser versions in the PC based systems using LINUX and Windows.

That all being said, there are those, because the Apple market share is growing no doubt, who are taking up the challenge to infect the Apple Faithful. You’ve been spared due to not being attractive (I’m not talking the aesthetics of the device design, but the ugly fact that Apples aren’t used to conduct serious financial business). That’s my tough love for you. Some are coming after you and the good news is you can now enjoy virus and malware protection as we PC users do.

Now let me, after turning your meme upside down, drop it on (your) its head: If the MacOS doesn’t get viruses, as some smuggly post to Facebook, why, pray tell, would giant anti-virus companies have software on the market to provide anti-virus for the MacOS that doens’t get viruses? Oh, yeah, it would be a very silly and costly idea to serve a market that has no need, right? Software costs money and then, as any product has to return some what of a profit, or it will be dropped from the company offerings for failing to add to the bottom line.

Check this Dogpile search out: Looks like Symantec, ESET, Norton and Webroot, Avast, AVG just to name a few “small” companies trying to sell something “real” Mac users don’t need.

I’m hoping this dose of reality spurs the Apple faithful to break down and admit they have been a tool in the greater Mac propaganda machine, but then get online and download an appropriate software package to protect themselves. Speaking as a complete PC/Windows user for all my own (too) many computers, it’s a pain to get them, I have two layers of anti-malware/virus on all my systems, just to practice as much safe computing as possible. I encourage you Mac types to do the same. I see the helplessness in people’s eyes all the time, when they have contracted such an infection. Trust me, you don’t want to feel that way, let alone missing your working hours while I or your Mac tech (who should have already advised you to get software – if they haven’t, send them this link so they can be better providers for their customer base) conduct the technical exorcism rites.

If you need help in getting protected, contact me and let’s get you into the real world you actually live in.

Malware and Virus attacks get more “life-like”

I spent a few hours pulling a serious malware infection, actually a set of 8 different ones, off a client’s main system yesterday. He contracted the mess at 5:40 PM last Monday.

My contention os these attacks are getting more “life-like” is based on the manner in which he identified the moment of problems: He has a major customer and he ships mountains of product to them via UPS. On Monday afternoon (consider what else was going on in the Post-Christmas days and UPS), he received and email indicating an updated delivery status for his UPS shipment. His comment was it appeared to look very much like others he had received via the major customer, so he clicked on it. He said it didn’t have fancy graphics, but it certainly was a detailed looking email, not a one liner with a link.

It also reminds me of the 1-3 emails I get a day into one of my other blogging emails that obviously some scraper picked up off that site. They tend to be advertisements, but they are mixed in with emails that are my accounts at (fill in the banking institution) suspended, blocked, etc. Some of them actually are all dressed up with HTML graphics layouts, too. I stay away, but then I deal with this daily. For others, like my client, when one comes that makes sense to their work flow/life/personal business/social networking, there is a likelihood they will allow the malware in, and their firewalls may not stop it.

For the user: You have to be wary of things that look kinda true , but something still tells you it’s not kosher and look closer before clicking.

Be careful out there and practice safe computing!

For you techs, looking how to get rid of this:

Anyhow, it really embedded itself within his system, flagged as a Win32 password stealer by Microsoft Security Essentials. The good news, in early Tuesday, I convinced him to take the rest of the year off and reward himself for a great year, and I’d be over Thursday morning (since the malware would allow a network connection for a few moments, then cut it off, so a remote session was out of the question.

I used MalwareBytes, Microsoft Security Essentials, Kaspersky TDSS Root Killer and old school digging through the entire registry, after seeing the names in the user appdata roaming and local files under nonsense random lettering named .exe files and folders.

I called this one a “repeater,” as MSE would identify it, clean it, then it would fire itself back up about 30 seconds later. I would see 8 different start up program listings named BitNefender 2016, turn them off, and they would be back, activated in the next reboot. Interestingly enough, searching for that name in the registry never found anything, even after several tries.

It was the searching for the keys and values in the registry and manually deleting them) that, in combination of the MSE and MalWareBytes scans that finally got things working normally, including restoring a constant network connection.

Friday Freebies: Comodo IceDragon

For a while now, I bave been using the FireFox based Comodo IceDragon for my browswer. I have long since left Internet Explorer behind, only using it when it was the only option for some things such as updates from Microsoft, and have long been a fan of FireFox from the folks at Mozilla.

Long before the added functionality of plugins arrived in the IE world, I had many, many useful plugins operating in FireFox.

Then I came across IceDragon about a year ago on the Comodo site Free Products page. I had been using their Dragon browser for a bit, which is based on Google Chome, and had built it up for some replacement functionality in the plugin world, but I wanted a FireFox version and they read my mind. So here I am.

Advantages of the IceDragon browser of “straight stick” Firefox:

1 – On the right end of the website address bar, where is a stylized blue “W.” That button is a tool the, when clicked, scans the currently selected webpage for infections. Think of it like a virus scanner, not for your comp[uter, but the site are looking at.


Click images for larger version

Why is this important these days? Beacuse the bad guys are hacking into and infecting legitmate websites. The result is you get intrusions into your computer, not by clicking the obviously hacking into freinds Yahoo email account sending out spam viruses, but without your inattention to detail for a mere moment.

2 – The browser has beefed up security checks, and will stop and ask you if you really want to go to a webpage that has indications of being a malicious site, or, in the case a site’s shopping cart that had their security layer (the SSL function, that ensures your credit card info is encrypted before it leaves your end of the transaction to purchase on the net) expire, which then makes passing your info a risky thing.

I have seen it also ask me if I wanted to continue, because the web address had more than some acceptable numbe or dedirect command (meaning the webiste keeps forwarding you to anothe domain/server for the content, but in this case, the redirects continued to bounce my request to other places). IN this case, it is a site I go to regulalry, and is a big name, but obvioulsy the bad guys use mulitlpe redirects to cover thier tracks in an effort to hide what they are up to, and IceDragon saw a similar pattern and asked me. I tried it in the current version of FireFox, out of curiousity, and it took me right to the sight. Good real time comaparison.

But, they you have your Friday Freebie courtesy of The Computer Whisperer!

Windows 8: The hackers are already in it…

This news is a few days old, but is telling: Windows 8 already has it’s own phishing and fake anti-virus malware attacks…

Hackers Already Blasting Windows 8 With Phishing, Fake AV Scams as reported in CRN.

In both cases, for those who keep asking me “why do these hacker do this?”, it’s about getting you to give them your credit card info…then they can go shopping on line for you and begin to try to steal your identity…simple, they have a business model of “crime does pay, if the gullible just hand me their bank information!”

Safe computing, you need it!

Do you have a strong password? Do you use it a lot?

Here’s the reality of our digital lives: We have lots of online accounts and they need passwords. Many people use ones that are easy for them to remember, and tend to use sometimes only one.

How does that affect you? Well, think about this: Once “they” get the one, then you’re life can be laid wide open to those interested in digging further. Since it’s not uncommon for sign ins to be your email address….someone (or a programmed crawling robot) could just travel the known email universe and common places like FaceBook and give it a whirl with your email and a common, made once, used always password of yours.

That’s bad enough, if you are in this category, but even if not, there is now an article that brings to light the technology that allows gamers to get really life like graphics, and for scientists to explore climatology, cancer, and signal from space, is also being exploited by hackers.

I invite you to take this introduction, and read as much of the ARS Technica “Why passwords have never been weaker—and crackers have never been stronger” and read it until you are sufficiently convinced you need to take action to protect yourself by putting some effort into your password selections.

Yes, this will take some mental energy, and changes to your daily digital operations, but….I’m sure you wouldn’t want to wake up to a screen full of mail, indicating your email has been exploited and your bank accounts have been emptied, etc, etc, etc.

Please help protect yourself!